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    1. #1
      Fekuni (Member)
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      Smiley Children of the SUN....RE-Vive-ing Our indigenous Afrikan diet

      Abibifahodie Afrikans!,
      This is a Blackducation session fam! here is a list of some staple foods that are primary in our Afrikan indigeneous diet. as we take our journey towards DE-whitenization and RE-Afrikanization, we must RE-member that in order for us to TRUE-LY DE-whitenize and to become more aligned with our ancestral way of life, we MUST RE-turn to eating the foods our ancestors ate, and completely rejecting the diet (and other psychopathic conditionings) of our enemies. if we choose to reject and deny the INSANITY of yurugus' psychotic social system, that has been FORCED down many of our throats for years, then we must begin to incorporate within our lives a method of RE-VIVING our ancestral ways of living in harmony with Asase Yaa and honoring our bodies as vessels of divine communication and TRANSFORMATION. i will continue to add to this list of ancestral foods, spices and other ingredients for cooking & i ask that we all contribute what we can. in this way WE will CONTINUE to learn how to EAT to LIVE and at the same time NOURISH & REPLENISH our MELANIN.:icon_sun: sistah Adachi, this ONE is for YOU, sistah-specially....ENJOY.



      Acai berry-and juice (from the Amazon region in Brazil)
      Acai can be found in the frozen section of your local health food store
      Preparation: In a blender, combine apple juice or any type of berry juice
      (or almond milk) and then add one pack of the frozen acai
      plus any other fruits that you want and ENJOY! this is great
      as a power shake for lunch when you don't want to eat too heavy....



      Papaya




      Mango/mango juice



      Guava (pink)



      Guava (white)



      Avocados (also called pear)
      My recipe suggestion: mash 3-4 ripe avocados until it comes to a thick paste,
      and then flavor it with some tamari and dulce seaweed (or use your imagination).
      mash the mixture together again, w/a spoon.use this as a spread on whole wheat
      pita bread (or crackers). i serve this with salad, fried plaintain or kelewele
      (plaintain which is diced into very small pieces and then spiced and baked).



      Mother and daughter sorting Bissap leaves in Burkina Faso



      Bissap drink (also known as Sorrel in the Caribbean)
      MY FAVOURITE DRINK! for the recipe check out
      www.congocookbook.com.



      Plaintain
      Preparation: must be peeled and then either sliced if you are frying or placed in foil if you are baking. plaintain can be baked, fried, steamed or grilled, any which way you decide to prepare it,
      it will ALWAYS taste BLACKALICIOUS!!!

      Nutritional value:
      When cooked, the fruit is extremely low in fat, high in fibre and starch. It is very low in cholesterol and salt too.
      A typical average size plantain fruit after cooking contains 50–80grams of carbohydrate, 2–3 grams of protein, 4-6 grams of fibre and about 0.01 to 0.3grams of fat.
      It is very rich in potassium.The potassium in plantain is very good for the heart and helps to prevent hypertension and heart attack. It is also rich in potassium, magnesium and phosphate.
      It is a good source of vitamins A, B6, and C which helps maintain vision, good skin, and build immunity against diseases. Cooked unripe plantain is very good for diabetics, as it contains complex carbohydrate that is slowly released over time.
      A diet of green plantain is filling, and can be a good inclusion in a weight loss diet plan. No wonder the nutritional value of plantain is unsurpassable.



      Fried plaintain



      Bammy, a well-known staple of Jamaica
      *made from pure cassava
      It is sold in many caribbean stores in north america
      (frozen section)
      Preparation: let the bammy defrost first. as my
      grandmother taught me, leave the bammy to soak
      in a little bit of milk (soy kwk) and then take it out of the
      milk and pat it with a paper towel. put some oil in a frying
      pan and fry the bammy on both sides. bammy in JA is
      mostly served with fish BUT since i don't eat fish i serve it
      with beans, my vegan palm oil stew recipe or even tofu stew.
      i do not eat fried foods alot but preparing bammy
      reminds me of being in my grandmothers' home and
      i also LOVE cassava.



      Bammy (prepared)
      I AM SURE YOU WILL LOVE IT!!!



      Cassava (raw)
      Preparation: first, peel off all the skin. then add some water to a medium sized pot
      (1/4 of the way)and bring to a boil. cut the cassava into pieces (about the size
      of your palm) and add the pieces to the boiling water. you can add some coconut
      cream and sea salt to the pot as well if you like. it should take about 15-20
      mins for the cassava to be ready. when you are able to penetrate the cassava
      pieces with a fork, then it is ready. serve with the stew of your choice.

      Nutritional value:
      Cassava contains a high amount of vitamin C and carbohydrates. It is also a good source of dietary fiber and contains approximately 120 calories per 1 cup serving. Cassava can also be substituted for potatoes in soups and stews.



      Cassava pone (a caribbean dessert :birthdays: made from cassava, my favourite "sweet tooth" appetizer)
      the preparation is a lil long so pm me for the recipe, i do have it....somewhere....



      Sweet potatoes
      Peel the skin off and boil in a pot with not too much water. or
      wrap in aluminum foil and place in the oven to bake. you can also slice
      it width wise and make sweet potato fries. children love it that way.



      West Afrikan yam (available at any Nigerian or Ghanaian food produce store)
      Preparation: cut the large yam in half (shown above).slice off the hard ends of the yam. then peel off all the skin. after this cut the yam into slices, width wise. get a large pot, add maybe 3 cups of water to the pot, turn the stove on high & make the water come to a boil. add some salt and other spices if you wish (i also add coconut cream) and then add your yam slices.cover the pot and turn the stove to medium heat. West Afrikan yam does not take long to cook at all, it will take about 15-20 mins max, not more. do not let your yams get too soft, they should still be firm. pour out the remaining water, i set it aside and use it as a base for my soups or stews. when it is ready remove it from the burner that it was cooked on.

      Nutritional value:
      Yams are high in Vitamin C, dietary fiber, Vitamin B6, potassium, and manganese; while being low in saturated fat and sodium. Vitamin C, dietary fiber and Vitamin B6 may all promote good health]. Furthermore, a product that is high in potassium and low in sodium is likely to produce a good potassium-sodium balance in the human body, and so protect against osteoporosis and heart disease. Having a low level of saturated fat is also helpful for protection against heart disease. Yam products generally have a lower glycemic index than potato products, which means that they will provide a more sustained form of energy and give better protection against obesity and diabetes.


      Pounding fufu (consists of either boiled yams
      and cassava or plaintain then it is put
      inside the mortar with one person pounding
      at the top and another person "turning" and
      shaping at the bottom)



      Fufu, eaten with soup.



      Callalloo, Afrikan/Caribbean leafy vegetable, from the same family of spinach
      Can usually be found at caribbean food produce stores in north america (esp. in areas where the weather is always warm)
      Preparation: chop the callalloo leaves into small pieces. add a little bit of water (less than 1/2 a cup), (OR you can use oil) to a large pot and add the callalloo, spice the callalloo well with sea salt, hot pepper and other seasonings (i use Irie veggie). leave on medium heat for about 10 mins. trust mi, callalloo does not take long to cook. serve with boiled yam, plaintain or cassava.



      Dasheen (also known as taro, malanga, cocoyam or edos)
      Available to purchase at any caribbean food produce store. dasheen leaves
      are also sold and are called "dasheen bush".
      Preparation: the same way you did the yam, peel and either boil or bake.
      serve with the stew of your choice.



      Edos, smaller size of dasheen, same family.
      peel the skin off, boil, bake or fry.

      Nutritional value:
      The leaves of the dasheen plant are rich in vitamins and minerals. They are a good source of thiamin, riboflavin,iron, phosporous and zinc and a very good source of vitamin B6, vitamin C,niacin, potassium, copper and manganese. the flesh of the dasheen is high in starch, and is a good source of dietary fiber.



      Cho-cho
      Peel off all the green skin. chop the cho-cho in pieces and add to your
      favorite stews, soups or stir-fries. or steam with other vegetables. cho-cho does
      take some time to cook so prepare it with vegetables that have a longer cooking time.
      season to taste. cho-cho looks similar to the pear.



      Garden eggs
      West Afrikan vegetable, family to the eggplant. i use garden eggs in my soups and stews.
      it may be available FRESH at your West/Central Afrikan food produce stores.
      DO NOT EVER BUY IT IN THE CAN.



      Hot peppers
      Used as an ingredient to give a distinct flavor to stews, stir fries and
      soups kwk. to be used with CAUTION.



      Sistah preparing Banku, a type of fufu made in Ghana,
      similar to East/ Central Afrikas' Ugali or Southern Afrikas'
      Sadza. prepared from ground corn or sometimes
      made from a mixture of corn and cassava. for
      Banku recipes check out www.congocookbook.com.



      Banku, READY to EAT
      I have NOT learned to make Banku, but it is my GOAL
      to learn it the next time i go to Ghana. it is available READY-MADE
      at the Ghanaian stores here AND that is where i get mine. so ask
      the Ghanaian stores in your area, if you have any.



      Kenkey (Accra)



      Kenkey (Fanti)

      Kenkey or Dokono or Komi is a staple dish similar to a sourdough dumpling from West Afrika, usually served with a soup, or stew. It is very popular in Ghana. It is usually made from ground corn, also similar to Sadza and Ugali. Unlike Ugali, making kenkey involves letting the maize ferment before cooking. Therefore, preparation takes a few days in order to let the dough ferment. After fermentation, the kenkey is partially cooked, wrapped in banana leaves, corn husks, or foil and steamed. There are several versions of Kenkey, such as Ga and Fante kenkey. Ga OR Accra kenkey is my personal favourite, i don't really like Fante kenkey. in all honesty, most Afrikans from the diaspora who i introduced to kenkey DID NOT like it. kenkey has a sour taste so i suggest you try it and see if you actually like it (Fanti Kenkey is EVEN MORE SOUR than Accra Kenkey) if not, well, there is always Banku! most Ghanaian stores carry READY-MADE Kenkey (frozen OR fresh)and it is also available to order at

      Preparation: bring about 3 cups of water to a rolling boil in a medium pot. remove the plastic wrap from the kenkey. put in your READY-MADE kenkey in the pot and cover w/ a lid. make sure the water is enuff to heat the kenkey, if not add more. let the kenkey heat up for about 20-25 mins if it was frozen or 15-20 if it was fresh. take the hot kenkey out of the pot, put in a bowl and peel off the corn husk. serve kenkey with palm oil stew or any stew of your choice, Kenkey tastes very good with tomato based stews and sauces.



      Amala, (also known as Elubo, which is the Yoruba name for yam flour)
      Elubo is made by cutting yam into small bits, it is then dried and ground into
      a smooth brown flour.The flour is used in preparing amala or lafun,
      which is a type of fufu.
      Elubo is popular amongst diabetics.
      It is recommended for diabetic patients because it does not contain
      refined sugar.Amala is one of the staple foods of the Yoruba people of
      West Afrika and is eaten with traditional African soups like egusi
      soup
      , ewedu, gbegiri or okro and stew.
      It is available to buy at most Nigerian and
      sometimes Ghanaian stores. it has no additives, artificial colors,
      white flour, salt or potato granules added to it (as far as i know....)
      just PURE yam or plaintain....and that's ALL.

      Preparation: Bring about a 3/4 cup of water to a boil. turn the stove down to medium low
      immediately
      when the water boils. stir in the amala flour and FIRMLY turn
      with a wooden spoon until it turns to a thick dough-like texture. i use
      very little water for amala b/c it cooks very fast. in MY opinion,
      amala is much better and HEALTHIER than all the other PROCESSED fufu
      "flour" products on the market in north america/europe kwk. so if you
      wanna try to make fufu i suggest you start with amala. some people
      have difficulty eating it the 1st time cause it is very different
      than what many of us are "used" to. if you don't like it, then try eating
      it with a tomato based stew. i find it BLACKALICOUS, esp. with peanut
      soup. i serve it with soup and stews.



      Palm fruit (from the palm oil tree in West-
      Central Afrika)



      Palm oil
      A chief ingredient in many Afrikan dishes, palm oil will mos. def bring that
      sacred ancestral flavor to many of your dishes. palm oil is high in beta-carotene,
      as well as Vitamin A and E. Praise/Zomi is the best brand you will find in north
      america/europe in my opinion. i use palm oil in most of my dishes, for peanut
      soup, palm nut soup,vegan palm oil stew and my bean stews, it gives the food
      its' finishing touch and enhances flavor to all your dishes.



      Okra
      I use okra in many dishes, mainly vegan palm oil stew and peanut soup. but most times i steam it alone or add it to my dish at the very end.
      Recipe suggestion: get one pack of okra. cut off the top of the okra and the tail. cut all the okra in very small slices. put a small pot on the stove with very little water. add the okra to the pot. VERY finely dice 1 clove of garlic, 1/2 onion,1 sm. tomato (optional) and 1/4 hot pepper (optional), add your spices and sea salt. add palm oil too. let the okra steam in the mixture for about 10 mins and then turn the stove on very low for 2 mins. turn off the stove and serve. i eat this dish w/cornmeal fufu, banku or gari.



      Injera w/ vegan delite combo
      I have no suggestions here....however i know that injera can be bought ready-made at many Ethiopian food
      produce stores and often like here, Ethiopian women prepare it and supply Arab stores. i have not "figured" out
      how to make injera as of yet. but when i do, y'all will be the 1st ones to know.....and if there are any Ethiopians or other skilled Afrikans in the house who are willing to teach "long-distance injera classes"
      I AM ALL EARS!!!!



      Berbere spice, a HOT Ethiopian spice used to prepare
      a Blacktastic stew made with red lentils (seen above w/the injera dish).
      AVAILABLE at most Ethiopian food produce stores.
      To order READY-MADE injera or berbere spice
      ONLINE check out this site: www.ethiopianspices.com.
      it IS Ethiopian owned & the products are delivered in 24-48 hours.
      here is a link for a few Ethiopian dishes-the recipes for Injera & Kik Wot
      (Red lentil stew) are included:
      www.ethiopianspices.com/html/recipes.asp



      Beans of all kinds....goin' back to Our ROOTS!
      when i cook my beans all i use is palm oil, Irie 100% veggie spice, 2 cloves of garlic and usually 2 onions. it is all about strategy and when is the best time to add what....i LIGHTLY steam vegetables separately to eat with my main course. i only use the berbere spice when i am cooking red lentils. some of the best beans for US are: nigeria beans (also called honey beans, they cook very fast and do not need soaking overnite), aduki beans, kidney beans, black eye peas, lentils, black beans, pinto beans, chick peas kwk. i always soak my beans the night before (other than red lentils) and i now buy ALL my beans organic. some brothers and sistahs told me that grains have the highest amounts of GMO in them more than fruits and vegetables. so i try my best to do a lil extra to buy my beans organic.





      For more in-depth study on Afrikan vegan nutrition check out these books:


      KEMETIC DIET by Muata Ashby

      VITAMINS AND MINERALS FROM A to Z by Jewel Pookrum

      HEAL THYSELF by Queen Afua

      SACRED WOMAN
      by Queen Afua

      AFRIKAN HOLISTIC HEALTH
      by Llaila Afrika


      AND do some research on Tariq Sawandi at www.blackherbals.com (or on google search engine)

      For online recipes check out Welcome to The Congo Cookbook - The Congo Cookbook (African recipes) www.congocookbook.com -.


      Here are some sites to order West Afrikan food online:





      Ghanaian
      _ www.jbafricanmarket.com -go to ONLINE STORE, then click on COOKING OIL and FOOD PRODUCTS for groceries
      (based in the U.S.)

      Nigerian
      _www.oluolufoods.com
      (based in the U.S. and Europe)

      Senegalese_ www.afroleck.com
      (based in Canada)
      Last edited by Kentake; 02-03-2009 at 07:16 PM.

    2. #2
      Fekuni (Member)
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      kweku, afro olmec's Avatar
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      Thumbs up Re: Children of the SUN....RE-Storing Our indigenous Afrikan diet

      greetings family, this is afrikantastic work by mut kentake on our ancestral diet, which is ingrained and encoded in our ancestral memory,we also have to eat what our ancestors ate,millet,sorghum,cassava,ground provisions, bread fruit,food that will enhance our melanin

      melanated food for melanated people!
      Last edited by Kentake; 01-28-2009 at 06:16 AM.
      "A people losing sight of their origins are dead, a people deaf to purposes are lost. Under fertile rain, in scorching sunshine there is no difference: their bodies are mere corpses, awaiting final burial." ~ Two Thousand Seasons by Ayi Kwei Armah

      " white people are nothing special to my african eyes" kola boof

      Kwa Jina La Mwenyezi Mungu Mwingi wa Rahema Mwenye Kurahemu - Swahili


    3. #3
      Fekuni (Member)
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      Kentake's Avatar
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      Smiley Re: Children of the SUN....RE-Vive-ing Our indigenous Afrikan diet


      Breadfruit tree



      Fresh Breadfruit, ready to prepare
      Recipes available at www.congocookbook.com
      OCCASIONALLY available at (some) caribbean food produce stores



      Roasted Breadfruit



      Fried Breadfruit



      Caribbean sweet potato
      Available at most caribbean food produce stores
      Peel the skin off, cut the end tails off, then cut in
      square pieces.bring 2 cups water to a boil in a small pot.
      add your sw.potato,some sea salt and let it boil for
      10-15 mins max. sw. potato cooks very fast.
      you can also bake grill, or fry them. children LOVE
      them b/c they REALLY are sweet! the skin
      is very hard, so it will take some time to peel
      make sure you use a sm. flat edged and sharp!
      knife and be careful not to cut yourself!



      Attieke (cassava couscous)
      Prepare in the same manner that you would prepare regular couscous.
      Attieke cooks very fast. serve with vegan palm oil stew, or bean stew w/ steamed vegetables.



      Attieke, prepared and ready to eat



      The preparation of Gari

      Gari is made from fresh cassava, which is grated and the excess liquid is then squeezed out. The remaining cassava is then fried over an open fire, on a broad metal pan that has been greased with a little oil, could be palm oil or other vegetable oil. The result product is crisp and crunchy to taste, and is stored easily and can be eaten with all kinds of stews or soups. in Afrikan secondary schools it is sifted, and then soaked in water, milk and sugar. Gari is truly a versatile food and inexpensive too.



      Gari, packaged and ready for the market
      Available at ALL Afrikan food produce stores and some caribbean stores too


      To make gari-fufu:
      Bring about 2 cups of water to a rolling boil in a medium sized pot. turn the stove down to medium as soon as the water boils. add the amount of gari that you would like to eat and stir firmly in a rapid circular motion with a wooden spoon. make sure that all of the water becomes dissolved in the grains, and you will see that the gari will come very thick, like dough. the gari should be a very firm ball when it is cooked. take it out of the pot, put it in a bowl and serve. divide the gari fufu in half if you are serving another person (or divide according to the amount of ppl you are serving).



      Soursop (also known as Guanabana)


      Soursop juice (box juice can be purchased at caribbean food produce stores in your area)
      Last edited by Kentake; 01-29-2009 at 09:34 PM.

    4. #4
      Fekuni (Member)
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      Adachi Indigo's Avatar
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      Thumbs up Re: Children of the SUN....RE-Storing Our indigenous Afrikan diet

      My Sis-Star tau-tu for the love and encouragement that you have sent to me though your work and dedication to afraka the ancestors and us who are incarnated for purpose. This is the knowledge for overstanding that will guide me to and through this journey that I have been choosen to pursue. I never would have known so soon about many of the blacktastic foods mentioned here in this dedication so from my heart and the hearts of my family...Tua-k Saneb :kiss:

    5. #5
      Fekuni (Member)
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      Default Re: Children of the SUN....RE-Storing Our indigenous Afrikan diet

      You are MOST BLACKTASTICALLY WELCOME sistah Adachi. as a mother who breastfed myself, i KNOW how important it is for sistahs who are breastfeeding to have the right nutrition, specifically based on the foods in our ancestral diet. we are passing on the energy of what we eat to our babies, and that is where they are receiving all their nutrients from as well. this is why the revival of our sacred ways of life; our tradition of honoring the Earth (Asase), is so crucial for each and every Afrikan who is dedicated to RE-Afrikanization. so it is VERY VERY IMPORTANT for ALL of us to be FULLY conscious and aware of what the Afrikan body, mind and soul needs to be healthy AND to remain pure and FREE of illness and contamination. and then for breastfeeding mothers it is DOUBLY important. so it is true-ly my pleasure to assist and advise you on this journey cause i know how important it is for US to be devoted to making the transition and it cannot be done without support and encouragement. well sis, keep on doing your research and i have also added some sites where you can buy West Afrikan food produce online so check them out. i am very happy that i can be of assistance to you and your family. looking forward to preparing meals w/you in the future. O dabo.

      Mut Kentake.
      Last edited by Kentake; 01-28-2009 at 06:02 AM.

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      Default Re: Children of the SUN....RE-Vive-ing Our indigenous Afrikan diet


      Sifting millet in Niger




      Millet dish


      Millet is one of the oldest foods known to humans and possibly the first cereal grain to be used for domestic purposes. Millet has been used in Africa and India as a staple food for thousands of years. Millet is a tall erect annual grass with an appearance strikingly similar to maize. The plants will vary somewhat in appearance and size, depending on variety, and can grow anywhere from one to 15 feet tall. Generally the plants have coarse stems, growing in dense clumps and the leaves are grass-like, numerous and slender, measuring about an inch wide and up to more than 6 feet long.
      The seeds are enclosed in colored hulls, with color depending on variety, and the seed heads themselves are held above the grassy plant on a spike like panicle 6 to 14 inches long and are extremely attractive. Because of a remarkably hard, indigestible hull, this grain must be hulled before it can be used for human consumption. Hulling does not affect the nutrient value, as the germ stays intact through this process.
      Once out of the hull, millet grains look like tiny yellow spheres with a dot on one side where it was attached to the stem. This gives the seeds an appearance similar to tiny, pale yellow beads. Millet is unique due to its short growing season. It can develop from a planted seed to a mature, ready to harvest plant in as little as 65 days. This is an important consideration for areas where food is needed for many.
      Millet is highly nutritious, non-glutinous and like buckwheat and quinoa, is not an acid forming food so is soothing and easy to digest. In fact, it is considered to be one of the least allergenic and most digestible grains available and it is a warming grain so will help to heat the body in cold or rainy seasons and climates.
      Millet is tasty, with a mildly sweet, nut-like flavor and contains a myriad of beneficial nutrients. It is nearly 15% protein, contains high amounts of fiber, B-complex vitamins including niacin, thiamin, and riboflavin, the essential amino acid methionine, lecithin, and some vitamin E. It is particularly high in the minerals iron, magnesium, phosphorous, and potassium.
      The seeds are also rich in phytochemicals, including Phytic acid, which is believed to lower cholesterol, and Phytate, which is associated with reduced cancer risk.


      Last edited by Kentake; 02-03-2009 at 08:25 PM.

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      Default Re: Children of the SUN....RE-Vive-ing Our indigenous Afrikan diet


      Fonio grain




      Fonio in its' natural state




      Packaged fonio
      Available for purchase at Boutique AFROLECK - Accueil
      Prepare as you do couscous or pm me for other recipes



      Fonio vegan casserole


      Fonio is possibly the oldest indigenous cereal cultivated in West Africa. The domestication of fonio seems to go back 7000 years, but the first references to fonio as food date from the fourteenth century. The Dogons of Mali, an ancient people, refer to the fonio seed as “the germ of the world”. They believed that the whole universe emerged from the fonio seed – the smallest object known. Nowadays, fonio still grows in farmers’ fields over a vast area extending from Senegal to Chad. Fonio is a staple food for many rural communities, especially for communities in the mountainous areas of the Fouta Djalon in Guinea. Farmers in Mali, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Nigeria and Senegal also cultivate the small cereal. West African farmers mainly cultivate white fonio (Digitaria exilis), which is also called fundi, findi, acha or “hungry rice”. In Nigeria, farmers grow black fonio (Digitaria iburua) as well. In Guinea, farmers also occasionally plant the so-called “fonio with large seeds” (Brachiaria deflexa) but this is, in fact, a different species.

      The production of fonio declined sharply in the 1960s but began to recover twenty years later. The increase in production can be attributed to larger areas being cultivated. Although average production per hectare remains relatively low, it has remained consistent at 600 - 700 kg/ha. At present fonio is grown on more than 380,000 ha and produces 250,000 tons of grain annually. Fonio supplies food to several million people during the most difficult months of the year when other food resources are scarce. In West Africa fonio is considered to be the tastiest of all cereals. Serving fonio as a dish at festivals or important ceremonies is always a good choice because of its fine and delicate taste. As a popular proverb says “Fonio never embarrasses the cook”. Fonio is also known for its nutritional properties. Although the protein content of fonio is similar or slightly lower than that of other grains, it contains amino acids like methionine and cystine which are essential to human health. These are often deficient in today’s major cereals. As fonio is known to be easy to digest, it is traditionally recommended for children, old people who cannot digest other cereals, sick people and for people suffering from diabetes or stomach diseases. Local pharmacists also recommend fonio for people who want to loose weight. Fonio, regarded as a minor cereal for a long time, is attracting renewed interest in the urban areas of West Africa because of its cooking and nutritional qualities. Agricultural policies in the region are also changing in favour of traditional crops to try and decrease dependency on imported food products.
      In order to meet the needs of urban households, small enterprises, set up by artisans’ or women’s groups, have recently started to sell already-cleaned fonio in the markets. In Mali, Burkina Faso, Guinea and Senegal, small businesses are marketing pre-cooked fonio packed in plastic bags of 500 grams or one kilo. These products are distributed to groceries and supermarkets and are even exported to Europe and the United States. However, the price of fonio prepared in this way is high because the grain has to be prepared manually and this is a long process.

      Processing fonio is a difficult and time-consuming task because of the extremely small size of the grain. One gram of fonio contains nearly 2000 grains and each egg-shaped grain is only about 1 - 1.5 mm long. After threshing, the grain is still surrounded by husks. This product is called “fonio paddy” or “raw fonio”. Like rice, processing paddy into whitened fonio is done in two stages. The first stage, known as dehusking or peeling, involves removing the husks from the seed to obtain the dehusked grain. The second stage, known as whitening, aims to remove the bran (the pericarp and the germ) from the grain. Dehusking and whitening of the grain is done by hand and require four to five successive beatings using a pestle and a mortar alternated with as many winnowings. The productivity of this work is very low. It takes nearly one hour to peel just one or two kilos of fonio paddy. Moreover, in order to obtain a quality product, all dirt and sand must be eliminated. This means that the product should be washed several times which also adds to the amount of time and effort required for preparation. Thus, mechanizing the processing and the cleaning of fonio is essential both to reduce the painstaking work for women and to improve the quality and availability of the marketed product.
      Last edited by Kentake; 01-30-2009 at 02:18 AM.

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      Thumbs up Re: Children of the SUN....RE-Vive-ing Our indigenous Afrikan diet

      Fonio an ancient grain



      Afrikan women pounding fonio


      Fonio cropping cycles vary from 70 to 150 days depending on the variety. Varieties with a very short cycle (70 - 85 days) allow the farmers to harvest early and enable them to cover the critical “hunger” season before the major food crops can be harvested. Farmers generally cultivate fonio on light sandy or stony soils as the crop is not very demanding. The late varieties, in particular, are well adjusted to poor soils. This small grass, which reaches heights of 30 - 80 cm, is very robust and can resist periods of droughts and heavy rains. One gram of fonio contains nearly 2000 grains and each egg-shaped grain is only about 1 - 1.5 mm long. After threshing, the grain is still surrounded by husks. This product is called “fonio paddy” or “raw fonio”.


      Sorghum



      Sorghum grain



      Sorghum flour (white)
      Available at some Afrikan food produce stores.
      sorghum flour is also available at health food stores.
      use as you would regular flour. can be used to make
      breads of all kinds.



      Young sistah making injera (made from sorghum flour)



      Kisra, a Sudanese flatbread made from sorghum, similar to injera

      Check out this site for more info on Afrikan health and traditional medicine- www.blackherbals.com. Our Blacknificent brother, Tariq Sawandi, who is an Afrikan nutritionist and scientist, teaches us about Sorghum and Millet in Afrikan nutrition, he states that these foods are an integral part of our Afrikan traditional diet.
      here is the link:
      http://www.blackherbals.com/sorghum_...african_nu.htm
      Last edited by Kentake; 01-30-2009 at 01:58 AM.
      "A people losing sight of their origins are dead, a people deaf to purposes are lost. Under fertile rain, in scorching sunshine there is no difference: their bodies are mere corpses, awaiting final burial." ~ Two Thousand Seasons by Ayi Kwei Armah

      " white people are nothing special to my african eyes" kola boof

      Kwa Jina La Mwenyezi Mungu Mwingi wa Rahema Mwenye Kurahemu - Swahili


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      Smiley Re: Children of the SUN....RE-Vive-ing Our indigenous Afrikan diet


      Acerola fruit tree (from the Amazon region of Brazil)


      Acerola,also known as Barbados cherry or wild crape myrtle, is a tropical shrub that bears a small fruit and is now considered very common throughout South America. This small tree is native to the Caribbean and northern South America; it is also cultivated in India. As an ornamental shrub, Acerola can also be trimmed into an easy-care hedge. Some reports suggest Acerola is native to the Yucatan. It is primarily consumed as juice and fruit.
      Acerola is actually the fruit of the tree, as well as the name of the tree. It is a berry that is purported to have healing power. Acerola has a higher vitamin C content than oranges (by weight), making its use as an antioxidant highly promising. Vitamin C content in Acerola is very high, contributing to strengthening the immune system and fighting off diseases such as heart disease and cancer.In addition to ascorbic acid, this berry provides a rich source of vitamin A, magnesium, pantothenic acid, and potassium. Acerola is marketed commercially for supplements, juices,jams, ices, gelatins, sweets and liquors. In addition to the food-based nutritional value of Acerola, it is used in traditional herbal medicine as an astringent, diuretic, arterial stimulant for the liver and renal systems, and as a tonic for general heart health.

      Acerola may be available at your local health food store in the frozen section or you can buy as a boxed juice, readymade.
      Last edited by kweku, afro olmec; 01-28-2009 at 05:49 PM.
      "A people losing sight of their origins are dead, a people deaf to purposes are lost. Under fertile rain, in scorching sunshine there is no difference: their bodies are mere corpses, awaiting final burial." ~ Two Thousand Seasons by Ayi Kwei Armah

      " white people are nothing special to my african eyes" kola boof

      Kwa Jina La Mwenyezi Mungu Mwingi wa Rahema Mwenye Kurahemu - Swahili


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      Blackicon Gossip Re: Children of the SUN....RE-Vive-ing Our indigenous Afrikan diet

      BLACKNIFICENT POST!!!
      :a7::kiss:



      M.E.

     

     
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