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    Thread: Maat and Order in African Cosmology A Conceptual Tool for Understanding Indigenous Knowledge

    1. #1
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      Default Maat and Order in African Cosmology A Conceptual Tool for Understanding Indigenous Knowledge

      Maat and Order in African Cosmology A Conceptual Tool for Understanding Indigenous Knowledge


      Denise Martin
      First Published March 20, 2007



      Abstract
      Maat is a comprehensive construct that existed throughout ancient Egyptian civilization. Cosmologically, maat is the principle of order that informs the creation of the universe. Religiously, maat is a goddess or neter representing order or balance. Last, philosophically, maat is a moral and ethical principle that all Egyptians were expected to embody in their daily actions toward family, community, nation, environment, and god. This work extends maat beyond the boundaries of ancient Egyptian culture and tests its conceptual elasticity by developing it into an analytical tool for studying classical African cosmological knowledge and how it relates to cultural expression. It focuses on the conceptualization of maat as the foundation of the universe and then uses the manner in which maat appears in ancient Egyptian culture as a basis for distinguishing patterns within classical African knowledge. This pattern contains 10 characteristics or dimensions: sacred, symbolic, visual, functional, moral, oral, communal, rhythmic, multidimensional, and holistic.


      Adejumo, C. (2002). African art: New genres and transformational philosophies . In T. Fayola & C. Jennings (Eds.), Africanizing knowledge: African Studies across the disciplines (pp. 165-190). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Google Scholar
      Ani, M. (1994). Yurugu: An African-centered critique of European cultural thought and behavior. Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press. Google Scholar
      Arthur, G.F.K. (2001). Cloth as metaphor: (Re)reading the Adinkra cloth symbols of the Akan of Ghana. Accra, Ghana: Af-oaks Printing Press. Google Scholar
      Asante, M.K. (1990). Kemet, Afrocentricity and knowledge. Trenton, NJ: African World Press. Google Scholar
      Asante, M. K., & Abarry, A.S. (Eds.). (1996). The Zulu declaration of innocence. In African intellectual heritage. A book of sources (pp. 371-378). Philadelphia: Temple University Press. Google Scholar
      Boone, S.A. (1986). Radiance from the waters: Ideals of feminine beauty in mende art. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Google Scholar
      Budge, E.A.W. (1959). Egyptian religion: Ideas of afterlife in ancient Egypt. New York: Gramercy. Google Scholar
      Budge, E.A.W. (1960). The book of the dead: The hieroglyphic transcript and translation of the papyrus of Ani. New York: Gramercy. Google Scholar
      Carruthers, J.H. (1986). This wisdom of governance in Kemet. In J. Carruthers & M. Karenga (Eds.), Kemet and the African worldview (pp. 3-30). Los Angeles: The University of Sankore Press. Google Scholar
      Chandler, W. (1999). Ancient future: The teachings of prophetic wisdom of the seven hermetic laws of ancient Egypt. Baltimore : Black Classic Press. Google Scholar
      Diop, C.A. (1974). The African origin of civilization: Myth or reality . Chicago: Lawrence Hill. Google Scholar
      Diop, C.A. (1991). Civilization or barbarism: An authentic anthropology (Yaa-Lengi Meema Ngemi, Trans.). Chicago: Lawrence Hill. Google Scholar
      Faraone, C., & Teeter, E. (2004). Egyptian maat and hesiodic metis. Mnemosyne, 57, 177-209. Google Scholar
      Finch, C.S. (1999). Science and symbol in Egyptian medicine. In I. van Sertima (Ed.), Egypt revisited (pp. 325-351). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Google Scholar
      Finch, C.S., III. (1995). Nile genesis: Continuity of culture from the Great Lakes to the Delta. In I. van Sertima (Ed.), Egypt: Child of Africa (pp. 35-54). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Google Scholar
      Finch, C.S., III. (1998a). Echoes of the old darkland. Decatur, Georgia: Khenti. Google Scholar
      Finch, C.S., III. (1998b). The star of deep beginnings: The genesis of African science and technology. Decatur, Georgia: Khenti. Google Scholar
      Frankfort, H. (1946). The intellectual adventure of ancient man. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. Google Scholar
      Gardiner, A. (1994). Egyptian grammar. Being an introduction to the study of hieroglyphs (3rd ed.). Oxford, UK: Griffith Institute, Ashmolean Museum. Google Scholar
      Gratton, P.M. (2003). What's in a name? African philosophy in the making . Philosophia Africana, 6, 61-80. Google Scholar
      Griaule, M., & Dieterlen, G. (1986). The pale fox (S. C. Infantino, Trans.). Chino Valley, AZ: The Continuum Foundation. Google Scholar
      Gyekye, K. (1995). An essay on African philosophical thought. The Akan conceptual scheme. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. Google Scholar
      Gyekye, K. (1996). African cultural values. Philadelphia : Sankofa Publishing Company. Google Scholar
      Harding, S. (1997). Is modern science an ethnoscience? Rethinking epistemological assumptions. In E. C. Eze (Ed.), Postcolonial African philosophy. A critical reader (pp. 45-70). Cambridge, MA: Blackwell. Google Scholar
      Hotep, U. (2000). Maat: An ancient African leadership principle . Pittsburgh, PA: Kwame Nkrumah Leadership Institute. Google Scholar
      Imperato, P.J. (2001). Legends, sorcerers, and enchanted lizards: Door locks of the Bamana of Mali. New York: Holmes and Meier. Google Scholar
      Karenga, M. (1984). Selections from the Husia. Sacred wisdom of ancient Egypt. Los Angeles: The University of Sankore Press. Google Scholar
      Karenga, M. (2004). Maat, the moral idea in ancient Egypt: A study in classical African ethics. New York: Routledge. Google Scholar
      Kunjufu, J. (1993). Hiphop vs Maat: A psycho/social analysis of values . Chicago: African American Images . Google Scholar
      Lichtheim, M. (1992). Maat in Egyptian autobiographies. Frieburg, Gottingen: Universitataverlag . Google Scholar
      Livingston, A.D. (2004). African science and spirituality, a synthesis of consciousness: The Dogon example. International Journal of Africana Studies, 10, 25-49. Google Scholar
      Madu, R.O. (1992). African symbols, proverbs and myths: The hermeneutics of destiny (Studies in African and African-American culture). New York: Peter Lang. Google Scholar
      Magesa, L. (1997). African religion: The moral traditions of abundant life. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis. Google Scholar
      Mbiti, J.S. (1992). African religions and philosophy (2nd ed.). Oxford, UK: Heinemann. Google Scholar
      Obenga, T. (1995). A lost tradition: African philosophy in world history. Philadelphia: The Source Editions. Google Scholar
      Schwaller de Lubicz, R.A. (1978). Symbol and the symbolic. Ancient Egypt, science, and the evolution of consciousness (R. Lawlor & D. Lawlor, Trans.). Rochester, VT: Inner Traditions International. Google Scholar
      Some, M.P. (1994). Of water and the spirit. New York: Penguin. Google Scholar
      Teeter, E. (1990). The presentation of maat: The iconography and theology of an ancient Egyptian offering ritual. Unpublished doctoral dissertation , University of Chicago. Google Scholar
      Tobin, V.A. (1987). Maat and DIKE: Some comparative considerations of Egyptian and Greek thought. JARCE, 24, 113-121. Google Scholar
      Tobin, V.A. (1989). Theological principles of Egyptian religion, American University Studies, Series VII theology and religion Volume 59. New York: Peter Lang. Google Scholar
      Wanjohi, G.J. (1997). The wisdom and philosophy of Gikuyu proverbs: The Kihooto worldview. Nairobi: Paulines Publications Africa. Google Scholar
      Welsh-Asante, K. (1993). Commonalities in African dance: An aesthetic foundation . In M. K. Asante & K. Welsh-Asante (Eds.), African culture: The rhythms of unity (pp. 71-82). Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press. Google Scholar
      West, J.A. (1993). Serpent in the sky. The high wisdom of ancient Egypt. Wheaton, IL: Quest Books, Theosophical Publishing House. Google Scholar
      Willis, W.B. (1998). A visual primer on the language of Adinkra. Washington, DC: The Pyramid Complex. Google Scholar
      Wiredu, K. (2004). Introduction: African philosophy in our time. In K. Wiredu (Ed.), A companion to African philosophy, Blackwell companions to philosophy (pp. 1-27). Malden, MA: Blackwell. Google Scholar
      Wood, J. (1996). The concept of the goddess. In S. Billington & M. Green (Eds.), The concept of the goddess (pp. 8-25). New York: Routledge. Google Scholar
      Wright, R.A. (1984). Investigating African philosophy. In R. A. Wright (Ed.), African philosophy: An introduction. New York: University Press of America. Google Scholar
      Attached Files Attached Files

    2. #2
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      Default Re: Maat and Order in African Cosmology A Conceptual Tool for Understanding Indigenous Knowledge

      Meda wo ase paa!



      ------------------------------------------
      Power is the ability to define reality and to have other people respond to your definition as if it were their own. - Dr. Wade Nobles
      Power is the ability to define reality and to have other people respond to your definition as if it were their own. - Dr. Wade Nobles

    3. #3
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      Default Re: Maat and Order in African Cosmology A Conceptual Tool for Understanding Indigenous Knowledge

      Yɛnni aseda

      Sent from my Uhuru Note using Abibitumi Kasa mobile app

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      Default Re: Maat and Order in African Cosmology A Conceptual Tool for Understanding Indigenous Knowledge

      Quote Originally Posted by Obadele Kambon View Post
      Maat and Order in African Cosmology A Conceptual Tool for Understanding Indigenous Knowledge


      Denise Martin
      First Published March 20, 2007



      Abstract
      Maat is a comprehensive construct that existed throughout ancient Egyptian civilization. Cosmologically, maat is the principle of order that informs the creation of the universe. Religiously, maat is a goddess or neter representing order or balance. Last, philosophically, maat is a moral and ethical principle that all Egyptians were expected to embody in their daily actions toward family, community, nation, environment, and god. This work extends maat beyond the boundaries of ancient Egyptian culture and tests its conceptual elasticity by developing it into an analytical tool for studying classical African cosmological knowledge and how it relates to cultural expression. It focuses on the conceptualization of maat as the foundation of the universe and then uses the manner in which maat appears in ancient Egyptian culture as a basis for distinguishing patterns within classical African knowledge. This pattern contains 10 characteristics or dimensions: sacred, symbolic, visual, functional, moral, oral, communal, rhythmic, multidimensional, and holistic.


      Adejumo, C. (2002). African art: New genres and transformational philosophies . In T. Fayola & C. Jennings (Eds.), Africanizing knowledge: African Studies across the disciplines (pp. 165-190). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Google Scholar
      Ani, M. (1994). Yurugu: An African-centered critique of European cultural thought and behavior. Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press. Google Scholar
      Arthur, G.F.K. (2001). Cloth as metaphor: (Re)reading the Adinkra cloth symbols of the Akan of Ghana. Accra, Ghana: Af-oaks Printing Press. Google Scholar
      Asante, M.K. (1990). Kemet, Afrocentricity and knowledge. Trenton, NJ: African World Press. Google Scholar
      Asante, M. K., & Abarry, A.S. (Eds.). (1996). The Zulu declaration of innocence. In African intellectual heritage. A book of sources (pp. 371-378). Philadelphia: Temple University Press. Google Scholar
      Boone, S.A. (1986). Radiance from the waters: Ideals of feminine beauty in mende art. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Google Scholar
      Budge, E.A.W. (1959). Egyptian religion: Ideas of afterlife in ancient Egypt. New York: Gramercy. Google Scholar
      Budge, E.A.W. (1960). The book of the dead: The hieroglyphic transcript and translation of the papyrus of Ani. New York: Gramercy. Google Scholar
      Carruthers, J.H. (1986). This wisdom of governance in Kemet. In J. Carruthers & M. Karenga (Eds.), Kemet and the African worldview (pp. 3-30). Los Angeles: The University of Sankore Press. Google Scholar
      Chandler, W. (1999). Ancient future: The teachings of prophetic wisdom of the seven hermetic laws of ancient Egypt. Baltimore : Black Classic Press. Google Scholar
      Diop, C.A. (1974). The African origin of civilization: Myth or reality . Chicago: Lawrence Hill. Google Scholar
      Diop, C.A. (1991). Civilization or barbarism: An authentic anthropology (Yaa-Lengi Meema Ngemi, Trans.). Chicago: Lawrence Hill. Google Scholar
      Faraone, C., & Teeter, E. (2004). Egyptian maat and hesiodic metis. Mnemosyne, 57, 177-209. Google Scholar
      Finch, C.S. (1999). Science and symbol in Egyptian medicine. In I. van Sertima (Ed.), Egypt revisited (pp. 325-351). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Google Scholar
      Finch, C.S., III. (1995). Nile genesis: Continuity of culture from the Great Lakes to the Delta. In I. van Sertima (Ed.), Egypt: Child of Africa (pp. 35-54). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Google Scholar
      Finch, C.S., III. (1998a). Echoes of the old darkland. Decatur, Georgia: Khenti. Google Scholar
      Finch, C.S., III. (1998b). The star of deep beginnings: The genesis of African science and technology. Decatur, Georgia: Khenti. Google Scholar
      Frankfort, H. (1946). The intellectual adventure of ancient man. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. Google Scholar
      Gardiner, A. (1994). Egyptian grammar. Being an introduction to the study of hieroglyphs (3rd ed.). Oxford, UK: Griffith Institute, Ashmolean Museum. Google Scholar
      Gratton, P.M. (2003). What's in a name? African philosophy in the making . Philosophia Africana, 6, 61-80. Google Scholar
      Griaule, M., & Dieterlen, G. (1986). The pale fox (S. C. Infantino, Trans.). Chino Valley, AZ: The Continuum Foundation. Google Scholar
      Gyekye, K. (1995). An essay on African philosophical thought. The Akan conceptual scheme. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. Google Scholar
      Gyekye, K. (1996). African cultural values. Philadelphia : Sankofa Publishing Company. Google Scholar
      Harding, S. (1997). Is modern science an ethnoscience? Rethinking epistemological assumptions. In E. C. Eze (Ed.), Postcolonial African philosophy. A critical reader (pp. 45-70). Cambridge, MA: Blackwell. Google Scholar
      Hotep, U. (2000). Maat: An ancient African leadership principle . Pittsburgh, PA: Kwame Nkrumah Leadership Institute. Google Scholar
      Imperato, P.J. (2001). Legends, sorcerers, and enchanted lizards: Door locks of the Bamana of Mali. New York: Holmes and Meier. Google Scholar
      Karenga, M. (1984). Selections from the Husia. Sacred wisdom of ancient Egypt. Los Angeles: The University of Sankore Press. Google Scholar
      Karenga, M. (2004). Maat, the moral idea in ancient Egypt: A study in classical African ethics. New York: Routledge. Google Scholar
      Kunjufu, J. (1993). Hiphop vs Maat: A psycho/social analysis of values . Chicago: African American Images . Google Scholar
      Lichtheim, M. (1992). Maat in Egyptian autobiographies. Frieburg, Gottingen: Universitataverlag . Google Scholar
      Livingston, A.D. (2004). African science and spirituality, a synthesis of consciousness: The Dogon example. International Journal of Africana Studies, 10, 25-49. Google Scholar
      Madu, R.O. (1992). African symbols, proverbs and myths: The hermeneutics of destiny (Studies in African and African-American culture). New York: Peter Lang. Google Scholar
      Magesa, L. (1997). African religion: The moral traditions of abundant life. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis. Google Scholar
      Mbiti, J.S. (1992). African religions and philosophy (2nd ed.). Oxford, UK: Heinemann. Google Scholar
      Obenga, T. (1995). A lost tradition: African philosophy in world history. Philadelphia: The Source Editions. Google Scholar
      Schwaller de Lubicz, R.A. (1978). Symbol and the symbolic. Ancient Egypt, science, and the evolution of consciousness (R. Lawlor & D. Lawlor, Trans.). Rochester, VT: Inner Traditions International. Google Scholar
      Some, M.P. (1994). Of water and the spirit. New York: Penguin. Google Scholar
      Teeter, E. (1990). The presentation of maat: The iconography and theology of an ancient Egyptian offering ritual. Unpublished doctoral dissertation , University of Chicago. Google Scholar
      Tobin, V.A. (1987). Maat and DIKE: Some comparative considerations of Egyptian and Greek thought. JARCE, 24, 113-121. Google Scholar
      Tobin, V.A. (1989). Theological principles of Egyptian religion, American University Studies, Series VII theology and religion Volume 59. New York: Peter Lang. Google Scholar
      Wanjohi, G.J. (1997). The wisdom and philosophy of Gikuyu proverbs: The Kihooto worldview. Nairobi: Paulines Publications Africa. Google Scholar
      Welsh-Asante, K. (1993). Commonalities in African dance: An aesthetic foundation . In M. K. Asante & K. Welsh-Asante (Eds.), African culture: The rhythms of unity (pp. 71-82). Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press. Google Scholar
      West, J.A. (1993). Serpent in the sky. The high wisdom of ancient Egypt. Wheaton, IL: Quest Books, Theosophical Publishing House. Google Scholar
      Willis, W.B. (1998). A visual primer on the language of Adinkra. Washington, DC: The Pyramid Complex. Google Scholar
      Wiredu, K. (2004). Introduction: African philosophy in our time. In K. Wiredu (Ed.), A companion to African philosophy, Blackwell companions to philosophy (pp. 1-27). Malden, MA: Blackwell. Google Scholar
      Wood, J. (1996). The concept of the goddess. In S. Billington & M. Green (Eds.), The concept of the goddess (pp. 8-25). New York: Routledge. Google Scholar
      Wright, R.A. (1984). Investigating African philosophy. In R. A. Wright (Ed.), African philosophy: An introduction. New York: University Press of America. Google Scholar
      I've studied a bit about Maat. But this info you shared even hits it home.
      Meda wo ase paa, me nua!


      KNOWing is better than beLIEving.

    5. #5
      Odimafoɔ (Contributor) Live Chat
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      Default Re: Maat and Order in African Cosmology A Conceptual Tool for Understanding Indigenous Knowledge

      That reference list is a beast! Won't say where I am looking for most of the titles first...but I am looking to get as many as possible to add to the reading.



      ------------------------------------------
      Power is the ability to define reality and to have other people respond to your definition as if it were their own. - Dr. Wade Nobles
      Power is the ability to define reality and to have other people respond to your definition as if it were their own. - Dr. Wade Nobles

    6. #6
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      Default Re: Maat and Order in African Cosmology A Conceptual Tool for Understanding Indigenous Knowledge

      Obadele, Meda ase para. This article is so informative and brings so much together. Abibitumikasa is definitely the place to develop our worldview and then to be able to apply that knowledge to life. Meda ase bio.

      Nana

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