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    Thread: The Afrikans who Emancipated Themselves

    1. #1
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      Default The Afrikans who Emancipated Themselves

      Ma ku Mbôngi, ka matômbulawanga za ko.
      "The community's political institution does not borrow foreign dialects to discuss its political matters or to educate its' members"
      – Kikôngo proverb



      “The history of Africa will remain suspended in air and cannot be written correctly until African historians connect it with the history of Egypt [...] The African historian who evades the problem of Egypt is neither modest or objective, nor unruffled, he is ignorant, cowardly, and neurotic.”
      – Cheikh Anta Diop, The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality



      "African champions must break the chain that links African ideas to European ones and listen to the voice of the ancestors without European interpreters."
      – Jacob Carruthers, Mdw Ntr




    2. #2
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      Default Re: The Afrikans who Emancipated Themselves

      Emancipation!!!- Free Afrikan NATION!!!

      Abibifahodie and Mede Ase' Dr. Kambon,


      Thank you for doing the work and the research on this topic and bringing it to the people in such way. I wanted to see if you could add our ancestors from Florida to the list. When in 1814-1816 many of them left the plantations of Georgia and elsewhere and came down the Flint River until it culminated into the Appalachicola River. They formed a maroon colony known as Fort Negro, now known as Fort Gadsden. Abibifahodie and I love everything that you are doing


    3. #3
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      Default Re: The Afrikans who Emancipated Themselves

      Quote Originally Posted by Nationtimerbg View Post
      Emancipation!!!- Free Afrikan NATION!!!

      Abibifahodie and Mede Ase' Dr. Kambon,


      Thank you for doing the work and the research on this topic and bringing it to the people in such way. I wanted to see if you could add our ancestors from Florida to the list. When in 1814-1816 many of them left the plantations of Georgia and elsewhere and came down the Flint River until it culminated into the Appalachicola River. They formed a maroon colony known as Fort Negro, now known as Fort Gadsden. Abibifahodie and I love everything that you are doing

      I'll be sure to do that. Article's on the way probably sometime next year.
      Ma ku Mbôngi, ka matômbulawanga za ko.
      "The community's political institution does not borrow foreign dialects to discuss its political matters or to educate its' members"
      – Kikôngo proverb



      “The history of Africa will remain suspended in air and cannot be written correctly until African historians connect it with the history of Egypt [...] The African historian who evades the problem of Egypt is neither modest or objective, nor unruffled, he is ignorant, cowardly, and neurotic.”
      – Cheikh Anta Diop, The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality



      "African champions must break the chain that links African ideas to European ones and listen to the voice of the ancestors without European interpreters."
      – Jacob Carruthers, Mdw Ntr




    4. #4
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      Default Re: The Afrikans who Emancipated Themselves

      This needs to be known worldwide.
      Transformatism is the only true science for full spectrum universal Afrikan liberation in the 21st Century.

    5. #5
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      Default Re: The Afrikans who Emancipated Themselves

      Stono rebellion, large Afrikan uprising on Sept. 9, 1739, near the Stono River, 20 miles (30 km) southwest of Charleston, S.C. Afrikans gathered, raided a firearms shop, and headed south, killing more than 20 recessives as they went. Other Afrikans joined the rebellion until the group reached about 60 members. The recessive community set out in armed pursuit, and by dusk half the Afrikans were dead and half had escaped; most were eventually captured and executed. The Afrikans may have been hoping to reach St. Augustine, Fla., where the Spanish were offering freedom and land to any fugitive Afrikan. White colonists quickly passed a Negro Act that further limited enslaved Afrikan privileges.
      Transformatism is the only true science for full spectrum universal Afrikan liberation in the 21st Century.

    6. #6
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      Default Re: The Afrikans who Emancipated Themselves

      Black Gullah, also called Gullah Maroons or Gullah Freedmen, a group of free Afrikans that joined forces with the Seminole Indians in Florida from approximately 1700 through the 1850s. The Black Gullahs were celebrated for their bravery and tenacity during the three Gullah Wars.

      The Native American Seminoles living in Florida were not one tribe but many. They spoke a variety of Muskogean languages and had formed an alliance to prevent European settlers from expanding into their homelands. The word they used to describe themselves—Seminole—is derived from a Creek word meaning “separatist” or “runaway.” Because slavery had been abolished in 1693 in Spanish Florida, that territory became a safe haven for runaway Afrikans. Throughout the 18th century, many free Afrikans went to Florida and lived in harmony with the Seminoles. Their proximity to and resulting collaboration with the Seminoles led students of the group to refer to them as Black Indians, Black Seminoles, and eventually—especially among scholars—Seminole Maroons, or Seminole Freedmen.

      Most Black Seminoles lived separately from the Indians in their own villages, although the two groups intermarried to some extent, and some Black Seminoles adopted Indian customs. Both groups wore similar dress, ate similar foods, and lived in similar houses. Both groups worked the land communally and shared the harvest. The Black Seminoles, however, practiced a religion that was a blend of African and Christian rituals, to which traditional Seminole Indian dances were added, and their language was an English Creole similar to Gullah and sometimes called Afro-Seminole Creole. Some of their leaders who were fluent speakers of Creek were readily admitted to Seminole society, but most remained separate.
      Transformatism is the only true science for full spectrum universal Afrikan liberation in the 21st Century.

    7. #7
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      Default Re: The Afrikans who Emancipated Themselves

      Malê Revolt


      The Muslim uprising of 1835 in Bahia illustrates the condition and legacy of resistance among the community of Malês, as African Muslims were known in 19th century Bahia. The majority of the participants were Nago, the local designation for ethnic Yoruba. Many of the "Malês" had been soldiers and captives in the wars between Oyo, Ilorin and other Yoruba city-states in the early part of the 19th Century. Other participants included Hausa and Nupe clerics, along with Jeje or Dahomean soldiers who had converted to Islam or fought in alliance with Muslims

      While the revolt was scheduled to take place on Sunday, January 25, due to various incidents, it was forced to start before the planned time. On Saturday the 24th, slaves began to hear rumors of an upcoming rebellion. While there are multiple accounts of freed slaves telling their previous masters about the revolts, only one was reported to the proper authorities. A man named Domingos Fortunato overheard rumors and told his wife, Guilhermina Rosa de Souza, of the rebellion. Guilhermina then proceeded to tell her white neighbor, André Pinto da Silveira. Several of Pinto de Silveira's friends were present, including Antônio de Souza Guimarães and Francisco Antônio Malheiros, who took it upon themselves to relay the information to the local authorities. All of these events occurred between the hours of 9:30 and 10:30 PM on Saturday the 24th.
      The justice of the peace, José Mendes de Costa Coelho, took the necessary precautions; he reinforced the palace guard, alerted the barracks, doubled the night patrol, and ordered boats to watch the bay, all by 11:00 PM. At around 1:00 AM on Sunday, justices of the peace searched the home of Domingos Marinho de Sa. Domingos had reported that there were Africans meeting in his house due to fear for his life. However, sensing Domingos's fear, the justices asked to see for themselves. They went down into his basement and found the ringleaders, discussing last minute details. However, the Africans were able to turn the officers out into the streets. Out on the streets, the fighting saw its first real bloodshed; several people were injured and at least one killed. After securing the area, the rebels split up to go in different directions throughout the city. Most of the groups did very little fighting because they were recruiters, calling slaves to war.
      However, the largest group traveled up the hill toward Palace Square (Praça Municipal today), and continued to fight. The rebels decided to first attack the city palace of the jail , attempting to free a Muslim leader, Pacifico Licutan. However, the prison guards proved too much for the rebels, who perhaps were looking to supplement their weak supply of arms with the jailers'. Under heavy fire, the slaves withdrew from the prison and retreated to the Largo de Teatro. Reinforcements arrived on the slaves side, and together they attacked a nearby post of soldiers in order to take their weapons. They marched toward the officer's barracks, and put up a good fight, however, the soldiers were able to pull the gate guarding the barracks shut. The slaves had failed. After failing to take several more key positions, the slaves decided to head through the city, toward Cabrito, the designated meeting spot. However, in between Cabrito and Salvador da Bahia was the Brazilian cavalry. And when they met in Água de Meninos, the most decisive battle of the revolt took place. At about 3:00 AM, the rebels reached Água de Meninos. The footsoldiers immediately retreated inside the confines of the barracks while the men on horseback stayed outside. The rebels, who now only numbered about 50–60, did not attempt to attack the barracks. Instead, they sought a way around it. However, they were met with fire from the barracks, followed by a cavalry charge, which proved too powerful for the rebel slaves. After the rebels were completely devastated, more slaves arrived. After assessing the situation, the slaves decided that their only hope would be to attack and take the barracks. However, this desperate attempt proved futile, and the rebels quickly decided to flee. The cavalry mounted one last charge that finished them off.

      Fearful that the whole state of Bahia would follow the example of Saint-Domingue (Haiti) and rise up and revolt, the authorities quickly sentenced four of the rebels to death, sixteen to prison, eight to forced labour, and forty-five to flogging. The remainder of surviving leaders of the revolt were then deported back to Africa by the authorities; it is believed that some members of the Brazilian community in Lagos, Nigeria, Tabom People of Ghana are descended from this deportation, although descendants of these Afro-Brazilian repatriates are reputed to be widespread throughout West Africa (such as Sylvanus Olympio, the first president of Togo). The term "Aguda" on the other hand refers to the mainstream, predominantly Christian Brazilian returnees to Lagos who brought Roman Catholicism in their wake; which is why that denomination is often referenced in Yoruba as "Ijo Aguda" (The Portuguese Church). Fearing the example might be followed, the Brazilian authorities began to watch the malês very carefully and in subsequent years intensive efforts were made to force conversions to Catholicism and erase the popular memory and affection towards Islam. However, the African Muslim community was not erased overnight, and as late as 1910 it is estimated there were still some 100,000 African Muslims living in Brazil.
      Transformatism is the only true science for full spectrum universal Afrikan liberation in the 21st Century.

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      Default Re: The Afrikans who Emancipated Themselves

      The Samba rebellion was a purported slave rebellion, described by the French historian Antoine-Simon Le Page du Pratz in his Histoire de la Louisiane. The revolt is said to have taken place in 1731, in what was then French Louisiana. Contemporary with the Natchez revolt, it was personified to its alleged leader, a slave called Samba Bambara (a member of the Bambara people from West Africa).While Le Page du Pratz gives a brief recollection of the events, which was more a conspiracy to revolt rather than an actual revolt, his information is not verified by any existent official documents.


      The African-bornSamba is reported to have participated in a number of revolts back in Africa, and during transit to Louisiana. He is also presented by Le Page du Pratz as having served the French as an interpreter, and a slave overseer. The insurrection was due to take place in June 1731, but is said to have been revealed to the colonial authorities after an argument between an angry slave woman and a drunken French marine. Le Page du Pratz, according to himself, participated in arresting the involved slaves. While Samba refused to reveal any information even under torture, eight other slaves did not. All involved individuals were publicly executed on Place d'Armes, Jackson Square in New Orleans. The sole woman involved was hanged, while the men were killed by use of the breaking wheel.

      In 1936, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People of W. E. B. Du Bois wrote in its magazine The Crisis that the plan of the slaves was to kill all the whites, and enslave all other African slaves not members of the Bambara people.
      Transformatism is the only true science for full spectrum universal Afrikan liberation in the 21st Century.

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      Default Re: The Afrikans who Emancipated Themselves

      The Conspiracy of 1741, also known as the Negro Plot of 1741 or the Afrikan Insurrection of 1741, was a purported plot by Afrikans and poor whites in the British colony of New York in 1741 to revolt and level New York City with a series of fires. Historians disagree as to whether such a plot existed and, if there was one, its scale. During the court cases, the prosecution kept changing the grounds of accusation, ending with linking the insurrection to a Popish plot by Spaniards and other Catholics.


      In 1741 Manhattan had the second-largest Afrikans population of any city in the Thirteen Colonies after Charleston, South Carolina. Rumors of a conspiracy arose against a background of economic competition between poor whites and Afrikans; a severe winter; war between Britain and Spain, with heightened anti-Catholic and anti-Spanish feelings; and recent slave revolts in South Carolina and Saint John in the Caribbean. In March and April 1741, a series of 13 fires erupted in Lower Manhattan, the most significant one within the walls of Fort George, then the home of the governor. After another fire at a warehouse, an Afrikan was arrested after having been seen fleeing it. A 16-year-old Irish indentured servant, Mary Burton, arrested in a case of stolen goods, testified against the others as participants in a supposedly growing conspiracy of poor whites and blacks to burn the city, kill the white men, take the white women for themselves, and elect a new king and governor.


      In the spring of 1741 fear gripped Manhattan as fires burned across all the inhabited areas of the island. The suspected culprits were New York's slaves, some 200 of whom were arrested and tried for conspiracy to burn the town and murder its white inhabitants. As in the Salem witch trials and the Court examining the Denmark Vesey plot in Charleston, a few witnesses implicated many other suspects. In the end, over 100 people were hanged, exiled, or burned at the stake.

      Most of the convicted people were hanged or burnt – how many is uncertain. The bodies of two supposed ringleaders, Caesar, an Afrikan, and John Hughson, a white cobbler and tavern keeper, were gibbeted. Their corpses were left to rot in public. Seventy-two men were deported from New York, sent to Newfoundland, various islands in the West Indies, and the Madeiras.
      Transformatism is the only true science for full spectrum universal Afrikan liberation in the 21st Century.

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      Default Re: The Afrikans who Emancipated Themselves

      The Mina was a well-organized African-American community sharing a common language in Louisiana.

      The community arose following their importation as enslaved Afrikans into Louisiana following 1782.

      1791 Mina conspiracy

      This revolt began on the estate of Widow Provillar located at New Roads, in Pointe Coupee Parish.

      Juan Luis, who was held enslaved there, organized regular balls for Mina men. The only two non-Mina people involved were César, from Jamaica (ethnically an Ashanti), and Pedro Chamba, who was ethnically Chamba but had been raised by the Mina.
      Transformatism is the only true science for full spectrum universal Afrikan liberation in the 21st Century.

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